You know your life is bottoming out when your only contact with living humans in days is the asshole at the liquor store and the little old lady who knows you want a bag of ice when you say the usual.

Maybe I'll live long enough to have one of Amazons new Digit robots walk up to my door and ring my Ring? Probably not...

I have two wifi connections sitting by my living room TV. One controls the house and one controls my devices. If you walk in my place all you have to do is scan the code on my wall to hook up to devices.

btw: This is what I was doing four years ago.

A1C is a fraud of big pharma and there is nothing to lower. I'm in the B&P with dopamine corner and there is plenty to lower.

No human contact today, good football, sweet pussy and life vibes on...

This teddy bear was a gift to me when I was born prematurely and placed into an iron lung for a week down in southern California more than 74 years ago.

How it has remained in my life despite losing all of my possessions multiple times over, is a magical mystery.

I did a good thing today. Faced with 50 days before I can see a specialist to deal with the genetic Parkinsons that's kicking my ass, I stopped by my local clinic and walked out with a prescription for dopamine. I told the doctor straight up that I take no meds and proud of it, but I need this one.

He initially said that taking it could skew the official diagnosis but I told him that if it worked, it would validate it. He smiled, and agreed. Doctor visit with my medicare advantage: $10.

I had them send the script to my local Walgreens and I went home for a bit so they could fill it and found Steph waiting, so we drove down to Alabama for lunch. When we got back they didn't have the drug in stock, not until tomorrow, and it costs $85 for a sixty day supply. I gave them my medicare advantage card and, $10.

This is the lowest level of dopamine dispensed. I'll take it and I would be thrilled if the tremors settled down in the slightest. Armed with 49 days of dopamine consumption history I will see the neurologist on Dec 11, and we can tweak the dosage from there.

My neighbor brought over a piece of wire from a new grain silo he's wiring. Then he drove me to the site and let me climb inside to shoot a video.

The wire is the diameter of a dime and it's a bitch to bend.

All of my latest toys have arrived, they've been installed and connected, and everything works great.

I've placed two wifi hubs behind my main tv in the living room driven by ethernet from my office, where I sleep, and wifi no longer emanates from there because it's off.

One hub drives my Echo (pre-original) along with the house smart devices like lights and coffee. The other hub provides internet to my phone, tablets, smart watch and the Ring camera mounted outside facing the street.

When I walk outside now my screens start buzzing and my wrist starts a knocking. I am so glad to have made it to 2020 and still have the smarts to pull this off!

I've developed a technique of breaking down my day into simple words or catch phrases:

Lewisburg: The name of the small town to the east that received the Amazon package destined for me in Lawrenceburg. I called that post office today and spoke to a great guy who confirmed that my new Samsung Galaxy Watch 3 that should have been in my hands Sunday was totally out floating around the universe.

Ashley: The Amazon rep I contacted who called me back from a Seattle prefix but was actually in Uruguay. Sweet voice, great English, it felt like a date and then she ordered me a new watch, be here tomorrow.

MonarchC: Riley and Brian's website https://monarchc.com is now on security steroids and the url is ready for business cards. Brian's wife is working on content.

Fifty Two: The number of days before I can see the neurologist. Tremors are worsening, quality of life is going to hell and I need drugs now. I'll be melting on the sidewalk as a quivering blob of mush before Dec 11.

My neighbor Daniel drops by on occasion to get his Piper Time.

There was a time when my programming skills were in very high demand, right out of college in 1971 thru 1992 actually. I made and spent a ton of money, helped form several startup companies and it was quite a ride.

Then I got into transportation up in Seattle and code went dormant for 15 years. As I was leaving town to Idaho with Steph I had started writing code again and I never stopped.

Isn't life funny? I never thought I would end up alone on a little dead-end street in a small town in southern Tennessee. Still creating, occasionally on the cutting edge, and it all means very little in the broad scope of the world.

I'm also old enough and wise enough to know that life is where you land, either live and enjoy it or suffer and die.

Sometimes you need to walk down to the creek and take a deep breath. Of whatever you have in hand.